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Health

Adenomyosis Awareness

Adenomyosis is a condition in which the inner lining of the uterus (the endometrium) breaks through the muscle wall of the uterus (the myometrium). Adenomyosis can cause menstrual cramps, lower abdominal pressure, and bloating before menstrual periods and can result in heavy periods. The condition can be located throughout the entire uterus or localised in one spot.

Though adenomyosis is considered a benign (not life-threatening) condition, the frequent pain and heavy bleeding associated with it can have a negative impact on a woman’s quality of life. Adenomyosis is a common condition. It is most often diagnosed in middle-aged women and women who have had children. Some studies also suggest that women who have had prior uterine surgery may be at risk for adenomyosis.

Check out this link (https://www.webmd.com/women/guide/adenomyosis-symptoms-causes-treatments#1) to learn more about Adenomyosis

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Health

Breast Cancer Awareness Month

About one in eight women are diagnosed with breast cancer during their life time. There’s a good chance of recovery if it’s detected in its early stages. It is very important that women check their breasts regularly for any changes and always get any changes examined by their Doctor.

Breast cancer can have a number of symptoms, but the first noticeable symptom is usually a lump or area of thickened breast tissue. Most breast lumps aren’t cancerous, but it’s always best to have checked by your doctor. You should also see your doctor if you notice any of the following:

  • A change in the size or shape of one or both breasts
  • A discharge from either of your nipples, which may be streaked with blood.
  • A lump or swelling in either of your armpits
  • A rash on or around your nipple
  • Dimpling on the skin of your breasts
  • A change in the appearance of your nipple, such as becoming sunken in to your breast.

Breast pain isn’t usually a symptom of breast cancer. The exact causes of breast cancer aren’t fully understood. However, there are certain factors known to increase the risk of breast cancer. These include:

  • Age; the risk increases as you get older
  • A family history of breast cancer
  • A previous diagnosis of breast cancer
  • A previous benign breast lump
  • Being tall, overweight or obese
  • Excessive use of alcohol

After examining your breasts, your doctor may refer you to a specialist breast cancer clinic for further tests. This might include breast screening (mammography) or a biopsy. In rare cases, Men can also be diagnosed with breast cancer.

Check out this link (https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/breast-cancer-in-men/ ) to read about breast cancer in men, how breast cancer is diagnosed etc.

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Health

World Mental Health Day

Our mental health is just like our physical health; everybody has it and we need to take care of it. Mental health problems affect around one in four people. They range from common problems, such as depression and anxiety, to rarer problems such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Mental health problems can affect anyone. Mental health is everyone’s business. We all have times when we feel down or stressed. Most of the time those feelings pass but sometimes they develop in to a more serious problem and that could happen to any one of us. Everyone is different. You may bounce back from a setback while someone else may feel weighed down by it for a long time. Your mental health doesn’t always stay the same. It can change as circumstances change.

There’s a stigma attached to mental health problems. This means that people feel uncomfortable about them and don’t talk about them. Many people don’t even feel comfortable talking about their feelings but it’s healthy to know and say how you’re feeling.

Check out this link (https://www.mind.org.uk/get-involved/world-mental-health-day/#) to watch a short animation which explains what mental health problems are and how they can affect us. Also check out this link( https://www.mentalhealth.org.uk/your-mental-health/about-mental-health/what-good-mental-health) to learn more about mental health and also the tips for looking after your mental health.

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Health

Sickle Cell Awareness Month

Sickle cell is a disorder of the haemoglobin in the red blood cells. Haemoglobin is the substance in red blood cells that is responsible for the colour of the cell and for carrying oxygen around the body. 

People with sickle cell disorder are born with the condition, it is not contagious. It can only be inherited from both parents each having passed on the gene for sickle cell. The main symptoms of sickle cell disorder are anaemia and episodes of severe pain. The pain occurs when the cells change shape after oxygen has been released. The red blood cells then stick together, causing blockages in the small blood vessels. These painful episodes are referred to as Sickle Cell crisis. They are treated with strong painkillers such as morphine to control the pain.

Sickle Cell Trait is when you are born with sickle cell trait. It is inherited when only one of your parents has passed on the sickle gene and will never develop in to sickle cell disorder. You do not have symptoms from sickle cell trait, so it is a good idea to have a blood test to see if you have sickle cell trait. Most people who have sickle cell trait are healthy. However, anaesthetics can cause problems. If you have sickle cell trait, always notify your dentist and doctor before treatment commences to be on the safe side.

SCD mainly affects people of African, Caribbean, Middle Eastern, Eastern Mediterranean and Asian origin. If you want to know about your sickle cell status, you can ask your doctor for a blood test.

Check out this link (https://www.sicklecellsociety.org/about-sickle-cell/) to learn more about Sickle Cell.

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Health

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common condition that affects how a woman’s ovaries work.

The 3 main features of PCOS are:

  • Irregular periods – which means your ovaries do not regularly release eggs (ovulation)
  • Excess androgen – high levels of “male” hormones in your body, which may cause physical signs such as excess facial or body hair.
  • Polycystic ovaries – your ovaries become enlarged and contain many fluid-filled sacs (follicles) that surround the eggs (but despite the name, you do not actually have cysts if you have PCOS)

If you have at least 2 of these features, you may be diagnosed with PCOS.

Polycystic ovaries contain a large number of harmless follicles. The follicles are underdeveloped sacs in which eggs develop. In PCOS, these sacs are often unable to release an egg, which means ovulation does not take place. It’s difficult to know exactly how many women have PCOS, but it’s thought to be very common, affecting about 1 in every 5 women in the UK.

Check out this link (https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/polycystic-ovary-syndrome-pcos/) to read more about the symptoms of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), causes of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and the treatments.