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Health

Pre-eclampsia

Pre-eclampsia is a condition that affects some pregnant women, usually during the second half of pregnancy (from around 20 weeks) or soon after their baby is delivered.

Symptoms of Pre-eclampsia

Early signs of pre-eclampsia include having high blood pressure (hypertension) and protein in your urine (proteinuria).

It is unlikely that you’ll notice these signs, but they should be picked up during your routine antenatal appointments.

In some cases, further symptoms can develop, including:

  • Swelling of the feet, ankles, face and hands caused by fluid retention
  • Severe headache
  • Vision problems
  • Pain just below the ribs

If you notice any symptoms of pre-eclampsia, seek medical advice immediately.

Although many cases are mild, the condition can lead to serious complications for both mother and baby if it’s not monitored and treated. The earlier pre-eclampsia is diagnosed and monitored, the better the outlook for mother and baby.

Check out this link (https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/pre-eclampsia/) to read more about the causes of pre-eclampsia, the treatments and more.

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Health

Stay healthy with Bizzytee Juice Plus!

A juice with a difference!

Order yours now to enjoy the benefits!

http://www.bizzytee.juiceplus.com

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Health

Mental Health Awareness Month!

Now more than ever, we need to find ways to stay connected with our community. No one should feel alone or without the information, support and help they need. It’s okay to feel unstable. It’s okay to need help. It’s okay not to be okay. Please take care of yourself. Make your mental health a priority!

Mental health includes our emotional, psychological, and social well-being. It affects how we think, feel, and act. It also helps determine how we handle stress, relate to others, and make choices. Mental health is important at every stage of life, from childhood and adolescence through adulthood.

Check out this link (http://www.mentalhealth.gov/basics/what-is-mental-health) to read more about the early warning signs and learn more about Mental Health.

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Health

National High Blood Pressure Education Month

National high blood pressure education month provides awareness regarding hypertension. Many people don’t even know they have high blood pressure. Symptoms of hypertension often go unnoticed and if left uncontrolled the risk of heart problems such as stroke or heart attack increase. High blood pressure education month encourages people to look at various lifestyles factors which may be contributing to high blood pressure. It is well documented that high levels of sodium (salt) is linked to high blood pressure.

It’s important to know your numbers. When blood pressure is measured, the upper number (systolic pressure) measures the pressure in your arteries when your heart beats. The lower number (diastolic pressure) measures the pressure between heartbeats. For most people, a normal blood pressure is less than 120/80.

The incidence of high blood pressure is about the same in men and women. However, there are gender differences between age groups. In people under the age of 45, the incidence of high blood pressure is higher in men whilst in the over 65 year age category it is higher in women.

Lifestyle changes which can help reduce blood pressure, include maintaining a healthy body weight (check with our BM1 Calculator), regular exercise, quitting smoking and following a healthy low sodium diet rich in fruit and vegetables. There are many affordable blood pressure monitors available for the consumer making it convenient to monitor your blood pressure at home.

Check out the following links for more information: (http://www.whathealth.com/awareness/event/highbloodpressureeducationmonth.html)

(https://nationaldaycalendar.com/national-blood-pressure-education-month-may/)

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Health

World Health Day!

Health according to World Health Organisation (WHO) is a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease. Physical health is about your body while mental health is how you think and feel.
This year’s World Health Day with theme “Year of the Nurse and Midwife” is dedicated to nurses and midwives.
This is to appreciate their contributions in making our world a healthier one.
Nurses are persons trained to take care of the sick or the infirm while midwives are health professionals who care for mothers and newborns around childbirth.

The roles of nurses and midwives especially at this time of COVID-19 have had tremendous positive effects on our lives. They risk their lives along the other health professionals to attend to their patients. On this day, the world says thank you for all you do 🙏❤

Meanwhile it is also good to emphasize the importance of taking good care of our health as “health is wealth.” Some of the ways we can achieve this are by taking balanced diet and by exercising.

Always Remember these:
“Love is not as important as good health. You cannot be in love if you’re not healthy. You can’t appreciate it.” – Bryan Cranston

“I believe that the greatest gift you can give your family and the world is a healthy you.” – Joyce Meyer

“Your health is what you make of it. Everything you do and think either adds to the vitality, energy and spirit you possess or takes away from it.” – Ann Wigmore