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World Autism Day

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What+Is+Autism

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Health

World Cancer Day

Supporting the Fighters, Admiring the Survivors and Honouring the Taken!

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Health

Cervical Cancer Awareness Month

Cervical cancer develops in a woman’s cervix (the entrance to the womb from the vagina). It mainly affects sexually active women aged between 30 and 45.

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Symptoms of cervical cancer              

  • Cancer of the cervix often has no symptoms in its early stages. If you do have symptoms, the most common is abnormal vaginal bleeding, which can occur during or after sex, in between periods, or new bleeding after you have been through the menopause.

Abnormal bleeding doesn’t mean you have cervical cancer, but you should see your GP as soon as possible to get it checked out. The best way to protect yourself from cervical cancer is by attending cervical screening (previously known as a “smear test”).

What causes cervical cancer?

Almost all cases of cervical cancer are caused by HPV. HPV is a very common virus that can be passed on through any type of sexual contact with a man or a woman. There are more than 100 types (strains) of HPV, many of which are harmless. However, some types can cause abnormal changes to the cells of the cervix, which can eventually lead to cervical cancer.

Check out this link (https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/cervical-cancer/) to read more about the symptoms of cervical cancer, screening for cervical cancer, causes of cervical cancer etc

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Breast Cancer Awareness

So last week, I shared the symptoms of breast cancer and also the factors known to increase the risk of breast cancer (https://nikkyosblog.com/2018/10/17/breast-cancer-awareness-month/). So, Today I’m talking about the types of breast cancer. There are different types of breast cancer, which can develop in different parts of the breast. Breast cancer is often divided in to;

  • Non-invasive breast cancer (carcinoma in situ): found in the ducts of the breast (ductal carcinoma in situ, DCIS) and hasn’t developed the ability to spread outside the breast. It’s usually found during a mammogram and rarely shows as a breast lump.
  • Invasive breast cancer: usually develops in the cells that line the breasts ducts (invasive ductal breast cancer) and is the most common type of breast cancer. It can spread outside the breast, although this doesn’t necessarily mean it has spread.

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Other less common types of breast cancer include:

  • Invasive (and pre-invasive) lobular breast cancer
  • Inflammatory breast cancer
  • Paget’s disease of the breast.

It is possible for breast cancer to spread to other parts of the body, usually through the bloodstream or the axillary lymph nodes. These are small lymphatic glands that filter bacteria and cells from the mammary gland.

Check out this link ( https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/breast-cancer/ ) to read more on Paget’s disease of the breast, breast screening, treating breast cancer, preventing breast cancer etc.

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Health

Breast Cancer Awareness Month

About one in eight women are diagnosed with breast cancer during their life time. There’s a good chance of recovery if it’s detected in its early stages. It is very important that women check their breasts regularly for any changes and always get any changes examined by their Doctor.

Breast Cancer Awareness Month

Breast cancer can have a number of symptoms, but the first noticeable symptom is usually a lump or area of thickened breast tissue. Most breast lumps aren’t cancerous, but it’s always best to have checked by your doctor. You should also see your doctor if you notice any of the following:

  • A change in the size or shape of one or both breasts
  • A discharge from either of your nipples, which may be streaked with blood.
  • A lump or swelling in either of your armpits
  • A rash on or around your nipple
  • Dimpling on the skin of your breasts
  • A change in the appearance of your nipple, such as becoming sunken in to your breast.

Breast pain isn’t usually a symptom of breast cancer. The exact causes of breast cancer aren’t fully understood. However, there are certain factors known to increase the risk of breast cancer. These include:

  • Age; the risk increases as you get older
  • A family history of breast cancer
  • A previous diagnosis of breast cancer
  • A previous benign breast lump
  • Being tall, overweight or obese
  • Excessive use of alcohol

After examining your breasts, your doctor may refer you to a specialist breast cancer clinic for further tests. This might include breast screening (mammography) or a biopsy. In rare cases, Men can also be diagnosed with breast cancer.

Check out this link (https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/breast-cancer-in-men/ ) to read about breast cancer in men, how breast cancer is diagnosed etc.